NWashington, D.C.

politicsprose:

National Poetry Month: Q&A with Michelle Chan Brown

Michelle Chan Brown’s Double Agent was the winner of the 2011 Kore First Book Award, judged by Bhanu Kapil. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Blackbird, Cimarron Review, Linebreak, The Missouri Review, Quarterly West, Sycamore Review, Witness and others. A Kundiman fellow, Michelle received her MFA from the University of Michigan, where she was a Rackham Fellow. She was a Tennessee Williams scholar at the Sewanee Writers’ Conference and received scholarships from the Vermont Studio Center and the Wesleyan Writers’ Conference. Her chapbook, The Clever Decoys, is available from LATR Editions. She lives with her husband, the musician Paul Erik Lipp, in Washington D.C., where she teaches, writes, and edits Drunken Boat.

1. What does it mean to you to be a poet in/from our nation’s capital?

I can claim semi-native status in D.C., and I’m energized, puzzled, excited, befuddled, and curious about the city’s changes (landscape, mood) since my 80’s/90’s childhood here.

I veer between cynicism and optimism. I see a city that’s wrestling, actively with its identity, especially as a cultural center. I’m intrigued that bureaucracy/art isn’t a binary here anymore, especially as I bike/run through neighborhoods like Shaw and Bloomingdale, and I’m grateful for  the places that have remained—P&P, for one.

2. Name one other poet who has influenced you profoundly and why.

I’m influenced by any poet that combine philosophical rigor with syntax and sound as emotional conduits: Plath, Thylias Moss, Darcie Dennigan, Srikanth Reddy.

3. Recommend one print and one online publication you think everyone should read this month.

There are so many beautiful, challenging, and innovative journals online—difficult to choose! I’m Poetry Editor of Drunken Boat, which is doing some outstanding new folios and always presents work that combines experimentation with accessibility with a sense of poetics beyond the U.S. Others: The Collagist, Better, Phantom Limb, diode, Diagram, Lana Turner, POOL

I’d also recommend Beltway Poetry Quarterly—Kim Roberts curates excellent work with a D.C. bent.

  12PM, Apr 17 2014
Comments 9 notes


skunkbear:

Read or listen to the whole story (from Christopher Joyce).

Image Credits:

  • Top two archive photos courtesy of the Museum of the Rockies
  • Middle two: Jason Thompson for NPR
  • Last two: Maggie Starbard/NPR

Welcome to the neighborhood!

(via npr)

  7PM, Apr 16 2014
Comments 2,519 notes


vintageblackglamour:

Marvin Gaye was born 75 years ago today in Washington, D.C. I can hardly believe that he was stolen from us 30 years ago. He is shown here, looking as smooth as ever in 1966. Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.

vintageblackglamour:

Marvin Gaye was born 75 years ago today in Washington, D.C. I can hardly believe that he was stolen from us 30 years ago. He is shown here, looking as smooth as ever in 1966. Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.

(via npr)

  6PM, Apr 3 2014
Comments 1,519 notes


postvideo:

See more of your D.C. Valentines here.

  5PM, Feb 14 2014
Comments 23 notes


  9PM, Feb 13 2014
Comments 508 notes


dcdocent:

Mark Jenkins is back! New sculptures in Georgetown. Photos by Sarah Rosner.

  8AM, Dec 14 2013
Comments 38 notes


linthenerd:

everythingscenic:

Henry V. Tony Cisek.

2013, Folger Theatre, Washington, DC

Director—Robert Richmond
Scenic Design—Tony Cisek

Costume Design—Mariah Hale
Lighting Design—Andrew F. Griffin

Cast
Henry V, King of England—Zach Appelman
Bishop of Ely, Bardolph, Williams—Louis Butelli
Nym, Westmoreland, Burgundy—Michael John Casey
Grey, King of France, Salisbury—Edward Christian
Katherine of France, Boy—Katie deBuys
Mistress Quickly, Alice, Bates—Catherine Flye
Exeter, MacMorris—Chris Genebach
Pistol—James Keegan
Scroop, Constable of France—Pomme Koch
Bishop of Canterbury, Fluellen—Cameron Pow
Cambridge, Dauphin—Andrew Schwartz
Chorus, Montjoy, Governor of Harfleur, Jamy, Erpingham—Richard Sheridan Willis
Musician, Gower—Jessica Witchger

Christ, citing the relevant designers and cast in these pictures was easy. It’s almost as if someone running this blog were just unwilling to do so.

http://www.folger.edu/template.cfm?cid=4594 

Info also found at Tony’s website: http://tonycisek.com/section/366713_HENRY_5.html

(via plaidleaf)

  5PM, Nov 26 2013
Comments 217 notes


dcpast:


July 11, 1939. “Tarzan paints the Senate flagpole. Washington, D.C., July 11. There comes a time each year when things around Capitol Hill need a bit of fresh paint, flagpoles no exception. Here is the flagpole over the Senate Office Building getting its new paint job, curiously enough, from a steeple-jack named Tarzan—Jack Tarzan.” Harris & Ewing Collection, Library of Congress.

dcpast:

July 11, 1939. “Tarzan paints the Senate flagpole. Washington, D.C., July 11. There comes a time each year when things around Capitol Hill need a bit of fresh paint, flagpoles no exception. Here is the flagpole over the Senate Office Building getting its new paint job, curiously enough, from a steeple-jack named Tarzan—Jack Tarzan.” Harris & Ewing Collection, Library of Congress.

(Source: loc.gov)

  11AM, Oct 18 2013
Comments 13 notes


milkcratetheft:

H Street Festval DC 2013

milkcratetheft:

H Street Festval DC 2013

  9PM, Sep 24 2013
Comments 8 notes


mrenzulli:

  2PM, Sep 16 2013
Comments 17 notes




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